A recent study, “The Science of Social Video: Turning Views into Value,” by the Vanson Bourne international research firm has a lot to say about a hot topic – the impact of social video on commerce.

We’ve been promoting videos for our clients – social and otherwise – for some time now, and reports such as this only solidify our commitment to the medium. If you are still on the fence for your organization, however, here are a few findings that led Vanson Bourne to conclude that “social video is driving significant brand interactions.”

  • Nearly 80 percent of consumers surveyed reported engaging with brands on social media, such as YouTube and Facebook.
  • Three in four respondents linked social video viewing to purchasing decisions.
  • Consumers surveyed reported spending an average of six hours per week watching video content on social media networks alone, and 67 percent said that this amount has increased in the past 12 months.
  • Americans emerged as the most likely to watch ‘how-to’ videos.

In addition, nearly 80 percent of respondents agreed that video the easiest way is to get to know a brand online.

We belief that’s the crux, as that’s what marketing today is all about – creating relationships and encouraging ongoing conversations. Pictures merely sweeten (and can hasten) the deal.

Still, as in most media, competition is fierce and only the strong will prosper. A video is only as good as the message it conveys, the emotions it creates and the results it drives. Thus, the incredible marketing opportunity afforded by social video could be quickly diminished by poor quality.

If social video is, indeed, a part of your marketing plan (and we believe that, in many cases, it should be), it requires a special skill set to get it right. Getting it wrong can get it noticed and shared, but not in the way an organization had hoped.

These are exciting times for an exciting media outlet. If we’ve piqued your interest, give us a buzz to learn more. We would be happy to discuss whether social video is right for your business, your product and your goals and how we can help you get started.

Just as the shoemaker’s child goes barefoot, marketing agencies sometimes forget to employ the same customer experience tactics for themselves that they do for their clients. That is, they get so wrapped up in the work that they forget to build the relationship. Then, at the end of the project or contract, while the client may walk away happy – he or she may also walk away forever.

That’s because the work is not enough.

Clients expect you to do good work when they hire you. Unfortunately, they may think anyone they hire can do the same caliber of work, so it doesn’t really matter whom they choose.

That’s why you have to make yourself the obvious choice, every time and all the time.

Often, it boils down to adherence to the Four Cs: Communication, Collaboration, Creativity and Commitment. And, while it may seem simple, their navigation actually is about as easy as a tightrope walk.

Communication is more than just keeping in touch. It is an ongoing process of give and take, but giving and taking in a way that is non-disruptive for both your organization and the client. That’s why a front-loaded system works best; that is, a strategic look at what already is being said and the goals of, and agreement on, new messaging. This reduces the need for meetings and constant wheel re-invention, enabling all to spend their time more productively and in a less stressful way. How does this create a strong relationship? With this approach, you become the archivist – the person/group that already has the informational foundation from which to launch more, and new, campaigns.

Collaboration, while easy to define, is definitely not a one-size-fits-all proposition. Some clients are more hands-on; others are more than happy to let you take the wheel. It all comes down to each client’s specific rhythms and comfort zones. It also ties in with what some call a concierge strategy, which focuses on providing exemplary service, advice and guidance to meet a wide variety of immediate needs. In marketing, however, it also involves taking the time to listen and understand the client’s long-term goals, marrying that with any episodic requests or one-off projects in order to promote a cohesive marketing effort. The best collaborations fall into the middle of the extremes, based on the mutual trust and respect that form the foundation for productive interactions.

Creativity, of course, is key – but not just for creativity’s sake. It is a sad fact that some agencies can get so caught up in the dazzle that they forget the message. The point is to make the client stand out in its market and industry, but in a good way and a way that builds and maintains momentum. We all have commercials we love but we couldn’t name the sponsor if our lives depended upon it. That’s why it is so important to help clients develop creative strategies that align with their business goals and generate a sustainable conversation about their brands.

Commitment, on the other hand, is one area in which it’s all right to be a little self-centered, nurturing a passion to do your best work at all times and pride that will allow you to do no less. This may sound like a no-brainer and it is – in the most literal way.

That’s because true commitment is a product of the heart, truly caring about the client’s future and being proud to do your part.

Like any strong relationship, the creation of an exceptional client experience builds up over time and requires concerted effort. And, as in any relationship worth pursuing, it requires regular tune-ups to keep it strong and never taking the connection for granted. In marketing, that means assuring the client stays on course but not on automatic pilot, engendering the confidence and loyalty that keeps the bond strong.

A recent New York Times article, “More Wretched News for Newspapers as Advertising Woes Drive Anxiety,” took me back to my days as a print journalist, when a certain editor, to keep us humble, would say, “Remember, you’re just filling the white space around the ads.”

He was right. At least at that time, studies showed that people, when presented with multiple publishers, subscribed to the newspaper whose ads reflected their local shopping patterns. For some of those people, nothing we ever wrote would be as important as a dollar-off coupon for ground beef.

But I digress.

The issue here is the bleak future of newspapers as they continue to be drained of the lifeblood that is print advertising and the question it raises, that is, where are those ads going? The answer, you may have guessed, is at your fingertips – on your phone and personal devices.

As reported in AdAge, the latest local ad revenue forecast from BIA/Kelsey indicates that revenue from local-focused online ads will exceed that of traditional ads aimed at local audiences by 2018. This “digital transformation,” statistics show, is taking place across the nation and “risks sidelining traditional print ads.” It also isn’t helping the television industry, as a new report by eMarketer projects that U.S. digital ad sales will surpass traditional TV for the first time by the end of this year.

The bright side for advertisers is that the emergence of digital outreach widens, rather than narrows their opportunities, offering new ways to win new customers.

Still, danger lurks, as every type of advertising – from sandwich boards to emails to the most sophisticated digital ad – requires a different type of knowledge and expertise to create and execute correctly, and most all campaigns require a mix of media. Further, when initiating digital outreach, which can far exceed any publication’s circulation or TV’s program viewership, advertisers pretty much have to get it right the first time.

In other words, it’s not for amateurs.

If you’re interested in initiating or transforming your own advertising, let’s start a conversation. We’d be happy to share our insights and help you share your word.

White papers are a great way to demonstrate corporate expertise, create a thought leadership position in an industry and provide value to prospects, customers and others.

Once done, these publications can serve as grist for social media, trade journal articles, presentations and even marketing collateral, with some added spin. When done well, they get passed on, expanding your reach in perhaps unexpected ways. When refreshed, they give you another opportunity to reach out to your target audiences.

Yep, white papers can do a lot – if, that is, you don’t ask them to do too much.

There’s an old saying that a camel is a horse designed by a committee. This sad fate can befall white papers, as well, when too many people with too many ideas attempt to create one solid document. With that in mind, here are a few things to remember when planning and creating a white paper.

  • Choose your writer or writing team carefully. If outsourced, look for experience, expertise and demonstrated success. If internal, make sure you are using subject matter experts who not only have writing talent but also actually want to do it. People who love to write – and are good at it – often will jump at the chance. Those who don’t – or aren’t – can bring progress to a halt.
  • Create an outline of the issue/topic you wish to address and product/service capabilities you want to highlight. Remember: You’re not making a sales pitch; you’re solving a problem or providing elucidation.
  • Decide on the key topics you want to showcase through callouts, bullets, sidebars and graphics to pull the reader through – or back.
  • Stay on topic! Throwing in additional – especially disparate – subjects as you go along dilutes your primary message and doesn’t do other topics justice. If a new subject is that good, consider giving it its own paper.
  • Know what makes your audiences tick. Don’t assume. If your white paper misses their hot buttons, you’re assured of a cold reception.
  • Back up every point you make with facts, statistics, quotes from experts, etc.
  • Set a deadline and meet it. Don’t let it become the project that won’t go away.
  • Make sure the design is as professional as the copy and adds to, rather than detracts from, readability.
  • Once it’s done, actively promote it. Posting it on your web site is not enough.

Think of the white paper as the elder statesman of persuasive writing – knowledgeable, authoritative and impressive. Given the respect it deserves in its creation, it can help your organization reflect those same attributes, building business and reputation.

Experts agree that online marketing is going to grow in leaps and bounds in 2016, with new formats and fresh ways to use old ones. It’s the wave of the future and those that don’t catch it could find themselves left far behind.

While opinions vary as opinions will, following are a few of the trends that the collective brain trust agrees should remain on businesses’ radar for 2016.

  • Content will remain enthroned, and unique story telling will keep customers and prospects interested by giving them information they actually want.
  • This year’s strategies won’t necessarily work next year. As in all things marketing, Innovation will be key.
  • In addition to ever-popular videos, visuals such as infographics will continue their upward movement in marketing plans, delivering messages and reducing landing-page bounce rates.
  • Wearable technology will add more details on people’s habits to the information already in all the embedded technologies that collect and exchange data. For marketers, this means outreach that can be behavior-driven.
  • Businesses will put more “social” in social media, stepping outside the box to show personality and create conversations.
  • There will be shifts in SEO best practices to match changes in technology.
  • Web sites will continue to transition to be more user-friendly for mobile.
  • Among platforms to watch for relevance to your business:
    • Live streaming video apps – such as Blab, Meerkat and Periscope – that enable a more personalized customer experience.
    • Snapchat, which is all about exclusive content that’s shorter, more to the point and has an expiration date so the old stuff doesn’t linger.
    • Instagram, which is seen as a major player as business marketing moves to mobile.
    • Periscope, an emerging video app is gaining strides in real-time business communications.
    • Expanding search engine capabilities on social networks, such as Pinterest.
    • Mobile payment apps that speed purchases and provide rewards that keep users coming back.
    • Virtual reality devices, such as the soon-to-be-released Oculus Rift, which could take online advertising into a new dimension.

Got it? If not, we do.

Let us know if we can help as you face the brave new world of digital marketing in 2016.

 

 

You can’t have a conversation unless you listen and respond accordingly. Otherwise, there’s no context and participants are pretty much talking to themselves. It’s the same with persuasive writing. To do it right, there’s as much ear-to-ground as fingers-to-keyboard involved.

This philosophy is at the heart of our new tagline, Content to Conversation, which actually is less a line than a circle of ongoing listening and conversing – all with the goal of persuading consumers to choose a client’s product or service.

The starting point is our initial engagement, in which we listen to clients to get their perspectives of who they are, their competitive environment and where they want to go. At this stage, we both collaborate and lead, integrating the client’s insights with our marketing knowledge and experience.

We also “listen” to the competition and market, adding to the client conversation and discovering its differentiators – those things that make them stand out.

We then create a plan that includes content designed to create positive change in the way the client and its products and services are perceived. When done correctly, that persuasive content begins a conversation among the client and its customers and potential customers, selling product, building loyalty and creating new champions.

The cycle is ongoing, as companies and consumers change over time.

There are some constants, however, including the basic rules of the persuasive content creation that forms the core of all messaging. These include:

  • Never promise what you can’t deliver or defend. (How many “world famous fries” have you eaten in your lifetime?)
  • Speak directly to the audience(s) targeted. (Know their needs; don’t guess.)
  • Promote trust in the company through specific, fact-based assertions. (“We’re the best,” doesn’t cut it.)
  • Provide the occasional “aha,” the “I never thought of that.” (We all love having new information to share with others.)
  • Solve problems. (Everyone loves a problem-solver.)

In other words, leave fluff to the cat, and make strong, compelling arguments based on knowledge and supported by logic.

Be someone worth listening to as a company, and you’ll turn conversations into sales.

It’s always good to know what your competitors are doing. And, according to an article on venturebeat.com, they may be bolstering their market position by cherry picking the best marketing talent.

What will get a marketer (or marketing company) snapped up these days? Article author Dharmesh Shah listed more than a dozen in-demand, “modern” skills that employers are seeking to meet the requirements of marketing today.

Shah, founder and CTO at HubSpot and co-creator of the inbound.org online community for marketers, created the list for job seekers, but it also indicates where marketing is and where marketing dollars are being spent.

His “Most In-Demand Marketing Skills in 2015” include:

– Content creation, especially as it supports inbound marketing

– Web development

– Web design with user experience expertise

– Search engine optimization

– “Agile marketing” that incorporates quick release cycles and an iterative approach

– Social media marketing

– Video production and marketing

– Community management for relationship building

Other “must-haves” on his list include the technical knowledge to put individual tactics in place – a BIG addition to the traditional marketing job description.

So, that may be what the “other guys” are doing, but how about you? Are these marketing skills in your toolbox or at least on your radar?

If not, maybe they, or at least some of them, should be.

It’s something to think about – but not too long. As marketers often have said: “Buy now. Supplies are limited.”

 

As early proponents of content marketing, we have been pleased to see it take its place not only among other required tactics but actually replacing some, as more and more organizations are sharing their knowledge to build reputation, business and loyalty.

Think about it on a personal level: Do you blitz past TV ads? Do you remember what that last pop-up was selling? Are you internally wired to be turned off by the hard sell? Do you just love to talk to telemarketers?

If you answered yes, no, yes and no, join the crowd.

This phenomenon has led both B-to-B and B-to-C marketers to look for new ways to cut through the noise. Enter content marketing.

As defined by the Content Marketing Institute (CMI), this marketing technique involves the creation and distribution of “valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and acquire a clearly defined audience – with the objective of driving profitable customer action.”

This content can be white papers, how-to videos, case studies, technical reports, etc., in which companies show and share their expertise.

Content marketing’s strength is that it is non-interruptive. Rather than being assaulted with sales pitches, prospects and customers are given access to useful information. The more times they find or receive that information under your name, the more likely they are to remember you.

As noted by CMI, quality content is part of all forms of marketing, shaping social media, Pay Per Click and SEO strategies; driving inbound traffic and leads; and serving as the foundation of successful public relations efforts based on issues of interest to potential buyers.

If you’re not a believer as yet, consider these survey results from Roper Public Affairs, which reports that:

– 80 percent of business decision makers prefer to get company information in a series of articles versus an advertisement.

– 70 percent say content marketing makes them feel closer to the sponsoring company.

– 60 percent say that company content helps them make better product decisions.

We firmly believe that content marketing is the wave of the future (and present, for that matter).

Will you ride it to success or be left behind?

 

I lost a friend to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). As she wrote in a blog about her diagnosis: “You know you’re in trouble when you go to the doctor hoping you have MS.”

A young mother of three, she eventually succumbed to pneumonia brought on by the symptoms of this horrible disease.

A talented writer, she also had a wry wit and strong sense of irony, and I’m sure she would have been greatly amused by a fundraising campaign that has people dumping ice water on their heads for the honor of donating to a charity.

Yeah, I know that’s not how it’s supposed to work. Theoretically, what most of us know as “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” is an either/or proposition – get iced down or pony up cash. But it has captured the public’s minds and hearts and increased the ALS Association’s coffers by nearly $16 million at last report, for a 767 percent hike over the same period last year.

Let’s face it, from a social media and PR point of view: It’s brilliant.

Naysayers (hereinafter referred to as “party poopers” for the purposes of this document) are calling it a sterling example of how to appeal to the vanity of the Facebook/YouTube-obsessed. Others point to the relatively few people who suffer from this particular disease or the unlikelihood of the fundraising’s sustainability. Still more like to point out that it wasn’t an original idea or, at its nascence, had anything to do with ALS.

Our reply is: So what?

Can’t we just take it for what it is – a viral phenomenon that shows the power of social media to do good and spread the word? And, for our purposes, its place as a necessary component in almost any public outreach effort?

People with ALS eventually lose their ability to speak. This campaign speaks for them in an inclusive way that creates community. Okay, so it may be a flash in the pan, but it shone bright and long enough to raise needed research dollars.

May we all be so successful.

The term Brand Ambassador means different things to different people. In some usages, it’s a corporate position; in others, it’s college kids handing out swag. Often, it means empowering employees to go forth and spread the word. And, increasingly, it means building a power base with a product’s or service’s fans.

In that regard, following are a few ideas to fuel the buzz you need from customers to create excitement for your brand.

1. Know the customers most passionate about your product. Look at the base you have and build from there. Google your company or product and see what’s being said. Then start brainstorming about how to turn comments into       commitment.

2. Create an aura of exclusivity. Not long ago, we talked about Maker’s Mark, a bourbon with an official Ambassador Program. What makes it cool is that it isn’t advertised (at least we haven’t seen it); it’s a word-of-mouth sort of thing that makes Ambassadors feel unique. (Trust me, if you know one, they never shut up about the product and look for it everywhere they go.)

3. Let your employees know what you’re doing and why. Get them excited, as well. You can even provide incentives for bring true Ambassadors on board.

4. Go social. Set up forums for your fans and get conversations started on social media or on your own web site.

5. Encourage your active Ambassadors to invite kindred souls. Remember that you’re not searching so much for quantity as quality when it comes to people who represent your brand.

6. Reward your Ambassadors. Whether with the occasional lagniappe, or insiders’ emails or special status at events or notifications specific to them.

7. Listen! Along the same lines, don’t forget to listen to what your Ambassadors say, acknowledge it and, if appropriate, act on it. There’s no better reward than knowing you’re being heard.

There’s more, of course, but these are some of the basics.

A good place to start is the next time someone says, “I use your product/service all the time.” Instead of thanking them, ask questions as to why. You may find out you already have Ambassadors. You just have to reach out to them to make the most of their enthusiasm.

Need help getting started? You know where we live.